David P. Calleo

David P. Calleo is an American scholar—a student of European and American politics, history and political economy—based at the Johns Hopkins University Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, where he is the Dean Acheson Professor. He also holds the title of University Professor.

Talks

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America’s Global Overstretch: Europe the Cure?

I started off this past summer hoping to write an essay on the global financial crisis and how it was affecting Europe’s evolving federal system. I was not surprised to learn that European leaders were handling things with rather more political skill than we were giving them credit for. What did surprise me, however, was, first of all, the large number and vehemence of Europeans apparently opposed to the Euro, and, by extension, opposed to the European Union itself. But, secondly, I grew impressed with the determination of most European states and the apparatus of the EU to defend the Euro. What I eventually came to realize was that the financial crisis was pointing toward basic geopolitical issues between the European and American federal systems, and among the European states themselves. Read More

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America, Europe and the Twenty-First Century

At the middle of the 20th century, Europe – the continent that had ruled the world for four centuries – found itself partitioned and dominated by two giant federal powers from outside – the United States and the Soviet Union. Within a very few years, however, the states of Western Europe, led by a reconciled France and Germany, and encouraged by their American protector, had mounted a continental federal experiment of their own, today’s European Union. The West Europeans, grouped together in their “Community”, grew skilled at manipulating the “superpowers”. In some senses, the postwar system began to grow more tripolar than bipolar. By the century’s final decade, the Soviet part of Europe’s postwar system broke down. Read More

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Morbid Decline

Is the United States a nation in decline? For over five decades this has been a recurring topic of American political discourse. The subject is sensitive and unsettling, and continues to raise discordant and inflammatory questions. For example: If America is in decline, is that decline inevitable? If it is not inevitable, who is to blame for it? Have successive leaders been wrong-headed or otherwise incompetent? Is national power being undermined by unfriendly critics? Or is policy bemused by unrealistic visions? Read More

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America’s Global Overstretch: Europe the Cure?

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Obama’s Dilemma

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The EU in A New Geopolitical Setting

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Are EU and US Geopolitcal Interests Still Largely the Same?

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Does a Weak Dollar Mean a Weak America?

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Power, Money and Balance

If you look at his month’s elegant invitation, you will note a strange omission. Where it says “Paper to be presented,” nothing follows. The next line simply says “essayist. Mr. Calleo.” This makes these invitations extremely rare, radically distinct from those for the preceding 1158 meetings. It may also make them valuable, like a postage stamp with the head of Washington upside down. Members would be well advised to hang on to their invitations. Anyway I am here to confess that the fault for this lack is not Mrs. Brooks’s, but entirely Mr. Calleo’s. I simply forgot to produce a title and then Avis and I disappeared into the wilds of Upstate New York until a couple of days ago. Read More

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The Feasibility of European Monetary and Fiscal Policies

Our subject is “The Feasibility of European Monetary and Fiscal Policies” What does a topic like that mean? To me it implies that Europe’s present economic policies might not be feasible. Feasible for what?

For sustaining the kind of political economic structure that we have grown up imagining that most of Europe ostensibly wants – i.e. a European Union: in its economic dimension, a common market with a common currency Why today does the feasibility of Europe’s policies for achieving and sustaining this Union seem a big issue? Because we are coming to suspect that the European continent is not a natural union, political or economic. Read More

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Speech before the 2005 graduating class of the University of Heidelberg’s North American Studies program

I feel privileged to join you today – to celebrate the success of the Heidelberg Center for American Studies – a fine new institution in a great old university. Not always an easy combination. All honor to those who have made it succeed.

Perhaps it is particularly appropriate that someone should be here from my own university, Johns Hopkins is sometimes called the first German university in America. Founded in 1876, it was our first research university on the German model – the first to offer the Ph.D. degree. Read More

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Hegemony and Decay: The American Case at the Turning of the Century

The paper reflects on the case for American “declinism” at the end of the Reagan administration, the apparent rejuvenation of American power in the Bush I and Clinton administrations, and the significance of developments under Bush II. How much continuity links these administrations?

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Transatlantic Geopolitics: Unipolar America and Multipolar Europe

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The US and the EU in World Politics

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1948 – Europe and America at Critical Moments: Lessons for the World

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Unipolar Fantasies: Clinton and Bush

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Europe’s Union: Model for a Plural World?

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Europe and the Geopolitical Balance after September 11

There has been a great deal of discussion in America about how the world has changed since September 11. Not surprisingly, people’s views of the “new paradigm” generally reflect their longstanding preferences. Old positions redecorate themselves in fashionable new imagery. Underneath, however, old differences persist. This seems particularly the case between the U.S. and Europe. September 11 has if anything only served to heighten the differences in transatlantic perspectives. This widening gap in geopolitical imagination threatens to cause considerable trouble within the Western alliance.

Read more on the Cicero Foundation website.

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Arms Control and Deterrence

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The Evolving Role of the Presidency and the Congress in Shaping the US Global Leadership

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Will NATO Last?

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Democracy and the Market

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Europe and the World Order after Cold War

What kind of role should Europe play in some “New World Order” after the Cold War? The answer depends on two other questions: What sort of Europe? What sort of World?

Europe order and world order have been intimately related throughout modern history. European states, it might be said, invented the world system. As early as the sixteenth century, they began conquering large parts o the rest of the world and tying them to Europe through intercontinental empires. Most of the time, Europe’s imperialism did not so much create a single integrated global system as imprint Europe’s own divisions on the world at large. That was because the continent itself was not unified but pluralistic, a “Europe of states” that merely extend its own contentious disunity into the rest of the world. Struggles for global empires were intimately related to struggles for predominance on the continent itself. As we know, no European state ever achieved predominance on the continent, at least for long. Since Europe has never united, the world dominated by Europeans and their rivalries was also never united.

One period was a major exception – the so called Pax Britannica of the mid nineteenth century, when European states accepted a high degree of global economic integration, fostered by a series of international regimes, in particular free trade and the Gold standard. Politically and economically, this integrated period was based on British predominance in the world beyond Europe, together with the absence of any effective candidate for hegemony on the continent itself. This state of affairs was the result of Britain….

 

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Globalization and the World Economy: Its Impact on Interatlantic Relations

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US-European Relations after Bipolarism: Lessons of the Last Five Years

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Humanitas Conference on Former Yugoslavia

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The New Agenda of American Politics

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The US and Europe: An American Viewpoint

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The Group of Seven: Role, Legitimacy and Working

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America as a European Power

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The Concept of the Nation State

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La Nouvelle problématique de la sécurité e de la défense en Europe

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US-European Relations: The New Agenda

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Europe’s “Communities” and the Energy Crisis